PENGUIN
Pre-K  Room
18-20 children
2 adults (at least one teacher) Meet the teachers…

GirlsPK

 

 

Schedule

6:30-9:00 Arrival, Breakfast, and Free Play
9:00-9:15 Clean-up
9:15-10:15 Outside Time
10:15-10:30  Bathroom & Wash Up
10:30-10:45  Snack
10:45-11:30  Circle/Activities
11:30-12:15 Wash & Lunch
12:15-12:30 Bathroom/Story or Books
12:30-2:30  Nap or Rest
2:30-2:45 Wash & Snack
2:45-4:00  Free Play – child’s choice
4:00-6:00 Outside Play (weather permitting) or Free Choice Activities

PENGUIN ROOM GOALS

Please note: All the Penguin Room goals were created with the Melrose Public Schools kindergarten goals in mind. The teachers and director meet with the Melrose Public Schools Curriculum Committee periodically throughout the year to understand these goals and set our pre-K curriculum to align with the committee’s goals. Additionally, they were created to align with the Massachusetts Preschool Learning Guidelines and the Teaching Strategies GOLD curriculum.
Communication
Children will:

  • Be able to name at least four items from a common category (for example, when asked  “What do you like to eat?” the answer could be “Milk, chicken, fruit, and ice cream.”).
  • Be able to follow a verbal cue (with no hand gestures).
  • Consistently stay focused on a task and be able to self-direct within the classroom.
  • Be able to respond to open-ended questions, such as “What is the duck doing in the book?” and ask questions when they need something.
  • Use word endings such as -ed and -ing.
  • Be able to follow a three- or four-step direction, such as “Clap your hands, walk to the door, get your coat, and sit down.”
  • Be able to speak in complete sentences using pronouns and determiners (the, an, etc.) appropriately (for example, “I am going to the park today.”).
  • Be able to answer a question in a complete sentence (for example, when asked “What is your favorite food?” the answer could be “My favorite food is pizza.”).
  • Be able to make eye contact with adults and their peers.
  • Be able to manage and express feelings in an age-appropriate manner.
  • Respond to greetings appropriately.

Gross Motor
Children will:

  • Be able to stand on one foot for at least 10 seconds.
  • Run, jump, hop (on left and right foot alternately), and climb.
  • Kick, throw, and catch a ball (with two hands).
  • Climb the rungs of a ladder and then go down the slide.
  • Throw a ball overhand in the right direction at least six feet.
  • Jump forward at least 20 inches.

Fine Motor
Children will:

  • Be able to apply the pincer grasp when using most writing utensils.
  • Be able to cut paper in half in basically a straight line.
  • Name and copy shapes.
  • Be able to button, unbutton, snap, and zip.
  • Be able to draw a person with at least four features (for example, a head, eyes, arms, and legs).
  • Work on small hand muscles through many activities, such as lacing, writing, and putting puzzles together.
  • Be able to write their name and write words in a journal.
  • Confidently put together an eight- to 10-piece puzzle.

Problem Solving
Children will:

  • Effectively use the “I know/I want to know/I learned” technique of learning for all subject areas.
  • Be aware of time and their schedule.
  • Involve themselves in pretend play.
  • Understand the concepts of under, above, between, and over, etc.
  • Know their colors and be able to say at least seven colors.
  • Be able to count physical objects up to at least 20.
  • Be able to mimic an adult’s number patterns (for example, if a teacher says to a child, “Say 12, 14, 20,” the child can repeat this).

Personal/Social
Children will:

  • Be aware of their surroundings and others in their personal space.
  • Take responsibility for the classroom and the materials within the environment (for example, take on jobs).
  • Develop a sense of community. This sense of community helps children feel they are important and part of the group, and also gives children the tools they need to welcome and include others. A question such as “How can I help you feel better?” is an example of this.
  • Participate in all parts of the day.
  • Put their jacket and shoes on.
  • Sit and use materials appropriately at activity time.
  • Make good and healthy choices for themselves and be able to take care of their own needs independently.
  • Demonstrate effective conflict-resolution skills and learn to introduce negotiation and compromise during conflict.
  • Use acceptable behavior during social interactions.
  • Be able to cooperate and share ideas in a socially acceptable way.
  • Know at least four of the following things: first name, last name, age, gender, phone number, birthday, and city they live in.
  • Wash their hands appropriately.
  • Tell you the names of three of their playmates.
  • Brush their teeth independently.

Literacy
Children will:

  • Dictate stories and help create charts.
  • Understand all parts of a book, including the cover, the title page, and the author, etc.
  • Learn to treat books with respect.
  • Notice patterns in books, such as rhyming, etc.
  • Recognize the majority of the letters in the alphabet.
  • Understand the difference between uppercase and lowercase letters.
  • Recognize their name on their cubby and be able to write their name.
  • Recognize the importance of print and see it throughout the classroom.
  • Demonstrate phonological awareness.
  • Demonstrate emergent writing skills and subsequently write to convey meaning.
  • Understand syllables and parts of a sentence.
  • Begin to understand the difference between a question and a statement.
  • Be introduced to sight words.

Math
Children will:

  • Distinguish between the different sizes of things (for example, if they are shown a small and a large circle, they can tell the teacher which one is bigger).
  • Have a general understanding of patterns.
  • Be able to compare and measure.
  • Connect numerals with quantities.
  • Recognize the numbers 1 through 20.
  • Begin to understand the concept of money.
  • Work with and create 3-D shapes.
  • Begin to use math phrases such as “more than,” “less than,” “addition,” “subtraction,” and “equal.”

Science and Technology
Children will:

  • Continue to use scientific-inquiry skills (for example, asking “What if” questions: “What happens if I plant this seed?”).
  • Start becoming curious about things and do science experiments to find out the answers to who, what, where, when, and why.
  • Be able to tell you three different things about a common object (for example, a ball: “A ball is round, you can throw it, and you can kick it.”).
  • Use science tools, such as a magnifying glass, measuring cups, etc., appropriately.
  • Demonstrate environmental awareness.
  • Be introduced to teacher-led technology, such as laptops, cameras, phones, and other simple technology and software.

Social Studies
Children will:

  • Demonstrate geographic knowledge of their local community and the world around them.
  • Learn their phone number and address.
  • Take on roles and responsibilities within the classroom.
  • Become familiar with U.S. holidays and symbols, and important people.
  • Be exposed to multiculturalism in various ways (for example, by having families share their customs and traditions, introducing the children to other cultures, and infusing multiculturalism throughout the curriculum).
  • Demonstrate knowledge of different families and different characteristics among people.

Transition Goals for Penguins Moving On to Kindergarten  (Created in Conjunction with the Melrose Public Schools Kindergarten Curriculum)
Communication
Children will:

  • Be able to follow a three- to four-step direction.
  • Stay focused on a task and be able to self-direct within the classroom.
  • Be able to respond to open-ended questions (such as who, what, when, where, why, and how).
  • Speak in complete sentences using pronouns and determiners, and use appropriate age-level tone.

Parents will:

  • Attend an exit conference with their child’s teachers.

Gross Motor
Children will:

  • Kick, throw, and catch a ball (with two hands).
  • Be able to throw a ball overhand in the right direction at least six feet.

Fine Motor
Children will:

  • Use a pincer grasp when using most writing utensils.
  • Be able to write their name in a designated space on paper.

Problem Solving
Children will:

  • Master counting physical objects up to 20.
  • Be aware of time and their schedule.

Personal/Social
Children will:

  • Be able to effectively resolve conflicts.
  • Know their first name, last name, age, gender, phone number, birthday, and city they live in.
  • Take care of classroom materials and use them appropriately throughout the day.

Literacy
Children will:

  • Know all parts of a book, including the cover, the title page, and the author, etc.
  • Master the majority of the letters in the alphabet.
  • Know the difference between a question and a statement.

Math
Children will:

  • Master the numbers 1 through 20.
  • Be able to create an A, B pattern without assistance.
  • Be able to use math phrases such as “more than,” “less than,” “addition,” “subtraction,” and “equal.”

Science and Technology
Children will:

  • Be able to use scientific-inquiry skills.
  • Demonstrate environmental awareness and an understanding of eco-friendly activities (such as recycling).
  • Be able to tell you more than three different things about a common object.

Social Studies
Children will:

  • Be familiar with U.S. holidays and symbols, and important people.
  • Take an active role in classroom jobs and responsibilities.
  • Be respectful of different families and different characteristics among people.

121 West Foster Street Melrose, Massachusetts 02176 - Telephone 781.662.6539